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Deftones - Deftones
Label: Maverick Records
Release: 2003

Tracklisting:
Hexagram
Needles and Pins
Minerva
Good Morning Beautiful
Deathblow
When Girls Telephone Boys
Battle-axe
Lucky You
Bloody Cape
Anniversary of an Uninteresting Event
Moana

Deftones - Deftones
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Average Blamo User Rating: (25 votes)

Hard rock and metal is a genre that seems to be slowly fading rather than burning out. Personally, I would prefer the latter as way too many musically shallow, lyrically unchallegened, and quite frankly boring artists are emerging into the mainstream. One of the last great hard rock bands around too has fallen victim of tasteless music.

The Deftones, once a lyrically intriguing band with orignal, foot stomping, head banging music, has turned into a band without direction, without inspiration, and without a love for music. Their previous 2000 release, White Pony, was nothing less than a masterpiece, combining a perfect balance between heavy metal with emotional rock. Going from tunes like "Elite," to "Rx Queen," and then straight on to probably their best song ever, "Change (In the House of Flies)," gave White Pony a sense of artistic brilliance.

The Deftones 2003 self-titled release, has a lot to live up to and definately leaves you with a bad taste in your mouth. Completely uninspired and unoriginal, this album forces me to listen to their previous albums to remind me why I still love them. Starting off decent with "Hexagram," "Needles and Pins," and "Minerva," the album had me believe it was something worthwhile and new. It sounded more alternative than metal but still had the classic Deftones edge with a Finch type of emotion. I couldn't have been more wrong. One boring song after another kept coming. I found myself being able to predict how the next section of the song would sound like, "here comes the heavy part." What was even more sad, was that i was right most of the time. And I kid you not, "Moana," sounds like a "Change," duplicate. Same notes, same tempo, same strum pattern on guitars.

"Let down," is the only phrase I can think of that acurately describes my emotions on this CD. It seems the Deftones tried to re-create an album instead of making a new one. The White Pony formula worked and the Deftones tried to recreate that formula with mediocre materials. Don't be surprised if you are upset with this new album, because I certainly was.

Reviewer Rating of CD :

the Deftones have always been known as a leftfield band, noticed for its brilliance in creating unquestioned hard rock with artful appreciation of its thinking audience. Deftones, the 2003 release from the band has proven that Deftones are still hard rock and are still mindful of their audience. Altogether, this album provides a good progression of songs from beginning to end, expressing further the personality of the Deftones and their devotion to challenging the listener.
Hexagram is probably the only track on the new album that is a little disheartening. As it starts off, it seems like, oh, another 3/4 track by a heavy band (like we haven't heard enough, as the form has recently been tired by pop punk bands trying to be original). The chorus especially is quite confusing as Chino screams "Worship, Worship, play play" in a very jagged fashion. However, after some time, if you tone yourself out of it, it becomes a good progression. If heavily scrutinized it becomes irritating. Which captures, quite frankly, the point of the whole album, rightly named Deftones (but we'll get that in the conclusion).
Needles and Pins is definitely one of the heaviest songs to be written in the past few years, not in its production, but in its attitude. Once the guitar and drums come in, minus the bass, it immediately convince you of the hard in hard rock. Chino's morbid blend of perfect pitch with imperfect tones (get it..Deftones?) provide a perfect plateau for the jagged emotions that the entire genre of Emo (the most annoying form of rock existent) cannot achieve.
Minerva is hands down, the biggest sounding song ever. Outer space, landscape, any way you think about it, without the trance rock of Tool or the big beat of Rage Against the Machine, this is the biggest sound ever achieved by a rock band. The sound of love, life and existentialism all in your face at once..."God Bless you all..."
Good Morning Beautiful gives you the feeling of driving a car somewhere with the verse, as if dreaming, and then the chorus falls out of key "You should wake up..." and Deathblow is immediately one of the most emotional songs on the record. Slow and moody at first, is crashes into a chorus that is jagged which Chino's screeching.
When Girls Telephone Boys is probably one of the best efforts of Emotional Rock, as Chino's screaming is so sincere that it disturbs the listener, immediately coercing any newcomers to change the track.
Battle Axe is definitely the cake winner on this record. The progression from quiet and concerned to loud and involved brings the listener to imagining Chino just found his wife dead. Simple yet powerfully convincing.
Lucky You is just another track that provides for the wierdness in the Deftones universe. Kind of like a sequel to "Teenager" from White Pony. Bloody Cape is another effort to convince the Emo kids not to be so pussified. The ending is so heavy and angry that you can't even listen to the full length of it at times.
Anniversary of an Uninteresting Event is morbid and sad, almost like the procession to a funeral, slow and melodic, putting the needles and pins to sleep. And finally, Moana serves as the final track...a final "This is what she does to me..." she being music.
Deftones is absolutely a deserving effort by the band who is scrutized unforgivingly, given the title of "art rock". One this record, they wanted to say "we don't have to think and think. We're not scientists, we're a rock band." And one of the few...they still are...

Reviewer Rating of CD :

 


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