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New Order - Waiting for the Sirens' Call
Label: Warner Brothers Records
Release: 2005

Tracklisting:
1. Who's Joe?
2. Hey Now What You Doing
3. Waiting For The Sirens' Call
4. Krafty
5. I Told You So
6. Morning Night & Day
7. Dracula's Castle
8. Jetstream
9. Guilt Is A Useless Emotion
10. Turn
11. Working Overtime

Waiting for the Sirens
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Average Blamo User Rating: (28 votes)

After a long-awaited "reunion" album like 2001's Get Ready, where does a band like New Order go next? It's hard to say.

2005's Waiting for the Sirens' Call picks up where that album left off, offering more dancey rockers driven by Peter Hook's amazing bass work. But where Get Ready was highly anticipated, and offered something new from New Order, this album seems to just offer more of the same. It's kind of like a movie sequel that isn't bad, but at the same time it doesn't add anything new to the original movie.

Tracks like "Guilt Is a Useless Emotion" and "Hey Now What You Doing" are good, but there's also a few duds ("Jetstream" being the worst).

While this album is good, it still doesn't compare to their classic albums like Power, Corruption, and Lies and Brotherhood.



Reviewer Rating of CD :

Krafty and the title track are the standouts on New Order's second new album since their long hiatus. Guilt Is A Useless Emotion is another highlight as the best dance track of the album but this is a somewhat disappointing album compared to Get Ready and even more so for older fans not as enamoured with this pop/guitar-heavy version of the band. This record is neither groundbreaking nor a renaissance (as Get Ready was) for the band. Apparently New Order had so much material for this album they decided to keep some tracks for a 2006? follow-up. Maybe they would've been better condensing the material - we'll find out.

Reviewer Rating of CD :

 


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